Bad Connections fic

Sep. 25th, 2017 07:14 am
tiggymalvern: (Hannibal - my design)
[personal profile] tiggymalvern
I've just realised that since I posted my last fic in a hurry before I shot out of town, I forgot to mention it here. Oversight!

Bad Connections. Hannigram, 5K words, set between Yakimono and Su-zakana.

Written for a porn trope challenge, for the prompt: “I’m fixing your *insert appliance/furniture/house thing here* for you and now I’m sweaty and half naked and you’re drooling” sex.

Cover Snark: Rooter & the Sunburn

Sep. 25th, 2017 08:00 am
[syndicated profile] smartbitches_feed

Posted by Amanda

It’s Monday and Cover Snark is here for you! And I do mean for you. Need a laugh? Read through Cover Snark. Looking for a work break? Try a dose of Cover Snark.

Rooter by Teiran Smith. A tattooed man is gripping a woman by the shoulders. In bright blue letters, the cover says Rooter.

Amanda: Excuse me, what’s his name?

Rooter?

Oh okay, just making sure.

Elyse: Wow

Wowwwwww

Sarah: POOTER.

Now that I’ve stared at it, the Roto-Rooter song is in my head. Thanks, book cover.

Carrie: Obviously the title is the worst offender but I also give props to the ways he’s looking at her boobs like “Huh, what do you suppose those are?”

Fake Marriage with the CEO by Amanda Horton. A man, presumably the CEO, is lying in bed with the title covering his bits. The man is also extremely red.

From Gloriamarie: He seems like he is willing to take care of himself. Why does he need a fake marriage?

Amanda: He looks sunburned and I’m not enjoying this weird eye contact.

Sarah: Yes, I agree. I believe his sunscreen was also fake.

Carrie: He waxes his armpits? Do guys do that? I had no idea.

Protecting the Prince by Dana Volney. A woman has her back to the reader. She's wearing a white tank top and loose jeans. Tucked into the back of her waistband is a gun. The hero is embracing her and is looking directly at the reader over the heroine's shoulder. It's discomfiting.

Sarah: I am not on board with the new trend of “the hero is looking at me.” I find it rather unsettling.

Amanda: That gun looks like it’s one step away from falling straight down her pants. No one wants a bullet to the butthole.

Sarah: Is “hide my gun in your crack” a new game or form or foreplay? If so, pass.

RHG: I feel like she’s not being as observant as I would hope a protection detail to be.

Carrie: She’s whispering in his ear, “If you are going to cheat on me with the reader then get your damn hands off my ass.”

 

Romeow and Juliet by Kathi Daley. Essentially, two cats are acting out the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet right next to a fountain.

Amanda: Admittedly, this makes me smile.

RHG: Awwwwww

“But soft! What meow through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juli-cat is the sun!”

Sarah: “Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious cat toy, the laser pointer sick and pale with low batteries.”

Elyse: Would read immediately!

Carrie: CATS! Would not read as a romance novel. But would read for the cats. Because cats

Giveaway: Kate Spade Cat Print Tote

Sep. 25th, 2017 07:00 am
[syndicated profile] smartbitches_feed

Posted by Amanda

Fall is nearly upon (most) of us and that might be a change in wardrobe. Scarves, boots, and the most comfortable sweater you own. But why not change up your purse collection too?

Good thing it’s giveaway time! Just for you, we have a Kate Spade Daycation Bon Shopper Tote in an adorable black cat print set against a-not-quite-lavender-not-quite-lilac background. Seriously, what shade is that?

Kate Spade Daycation Bon Shopper Tote in a light purple with a black cat print

Though the bag is no longer on the Kate Spade website, Amazon has the bag’s specifications:

  • 13.5″ inches high x 12.3″ inches wide
  • The drop length of the hand is 8.3″ inches
  • Printed coated poplin with patent PVC trim
  • Dual interior slide pockets

I think the bag is perfect for a gloomy, misty fall afternoon!

Standard disclaimers apply: We’re not being compensated for this giveaway. Void where prohibited. Open to international residents where permitted by applicable law. Must be over 18. Must love cats. Or dogs. Any animal is acceptable really. Be ready to fit lots of books or an e-reader inside! Bonus points if your e-reader cover matches the bag. Comments will close Friday 29 September 2017 around noon EST and winner announced same day.

Ready to enter?

Leave a comment and let us know what book (digital or paper) will be the first to find a home in your Kate Spade cat bag! 

Best of luck!

littlereview: (green little review)
[personal profile] littlereview
Three things hold me captive )

We had some ambitious plans for Sunday that included possible apple picking or walking around downtown, but we also had a bunch of chores to do, so we ended up being somewhat less ambitious after watching the Ravens embarrass themselves in London in the first of many crazy football games today. We had a bunch of shopping to do, so we stopped at the mall and some local stores, walked around Washingtonian Lake, and fixed up some things around the house.

My parents had a friend over for dinner and invited us to join them; they ordered pizza, we brought cookies and Maddy, and we ate out on the deck. Then we came home and declined the one free hour of Star Trek: Discovery in favor of the DC football game against the Raiders; I generally try to avoid them but even the jerk of an owner joined the players' solidarity display during the national anthem. Some farm festival photos around South Mountain:


Fair Season )

Cried

Sep. 25th, 2017 12:03 am
zhelana: (Firefly - Stone)
[personal profile] zhelana
When was the last time you cried?

about 5 minutes ago, because my poor dog.

the rest )

Music Monday

Sep. 24th, 2017 11:59 pm
zhelana: (Original - Waiting)
[personal profile] zhelana
20. A song that has many meanings to you:



the rest )

I would have thought lawful

Sep. 24th, 2017 11:59 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
I Am A: Chaotic Good Human Paladin/Sorcerer (4th/3rd Level)


Ability Scores:

Strength-13

Dexterity-8

Constitution-16

Intelligence-10

Wisdom-8

Charisma-7


Alignment:
Chaotic Good A chaotic good character acts as his conscience directs him with little regard for what others expect of him. He makes his own way, but he's kind and benevolent. He believes in goodness and right but has little use for laws and regulations. He hates it when people try to intimidate others and tell them what to do. He follows his own moral compass, which, although good, may not agree with that of society. Chaotic good is the best alignment you can be because it combines a good heart with a free spirit. However, chaotic good can be a dangerous alignment when it disrupts the order of society and punishes those who do well for themselves.


Race:
Humans are the most adaptable of the common races. Short generations and a penchant for migration and conquest have made them physically diverse as well. Humans are often unorthodox in their dress, sporting unusual hairstyles, fanciful clothes, tattoos, and the like.


Primary Class:
Paladins take their adventures seriously, and even a mundane mission is, in the heart of the paladin, a personal test an opportunity to demonstrate bravery, to learn tactics, and to find ways to do good. Divine power protects these warriors of virtue, warding off harm, protecting from disease, healing, and guarding against fear. The paladin can also direct this power to help others, healing wounds or curing diseases, and also use it to destroy evil. Experienced paladins can smite evil foes and turn away undead. A paladin's Wisdom score should be high, as this determines the maximum spell level that they can cast. Many of the paladin's special abilities also benefit from a high Charisma score.


Secondary Class:
Sorcerers are arcane spellcasters who manipulate magic energy with imagination and talent rather than studious discipline. They have no books, no mentors, no theories just raw power that they direct at will. Sorcerers know fewer spells than wizards do and acquire them more slowly, but they can cast individual spells more often and have no need to prepare their incantations ahead of time. Also unlike wizards, sorcerers cannot specialize in a school of magic. Since sorcerers gain their powers without undergoing the years of rigorous study that wizards go through, they have more time to learn fighting skills and are proficient with simple weapons. Charisma is very important for sorcerers; the higher their value in this ability, the higher the spell level they can cast.


Find out What Kind of Dungeons and Dragons Character Would You Be?, courtesy of Easydamus (e-mail)

87F - 65F : Sunny

Sep. 24th, 2017 09:45 pm
zhelana: (Nemo - found)
[personal profile] zhelana
Today animal control came to our house and told us that the delivery driver complained to them that our dog bit him. Although it was clear that he had not been bitten and had just sustained a minor scratch, because he claimed he had been bitten there was nothing anyone could do, and our dog has to go to quarantine, at our expense, for 10 days. This happened once to my mom's friend and it cost her $300. I don't have $300 lying around! I mean, yeah, things just got a bit better with Kevin's promotion, but not enough better to take a $300 hit our first half-month of it. We're still playing catch up. There are two trees down in our yard since the hurricane, and we can't pay to move those, we both needed new tires because of nails that had them completely flat, and we put that on a credit card we can't pay off, And I just don't know what to do.

Kevin is busy writing negative reviews of his employer. I wish I thought they'd get him fired.

I'm fighting off panic at the price tag, and anger that the animal control agent said he clearly wasn't bitten but there's still nothing they can do and anger that he is slandering my dog (but my dog probably does not have legal standing in a court to sue him - which Kevin won't let me consider doing anyway). And desperate sadness because my dog is going to be locked away with no one to love him, and he's not going to understand why he doesn't have even his sister with him for the first time in his life. And I'm afraid if he's in quarantine they won't be able to let him go outside throughout the day. And basically, my poor dog, who did nothing but try to make a friend he thought was playing with him.

Otherwise, I was supposed to go to the zoo today for gorilla day, to do arts and crafts activities with kids. I emailed two people to ask where to meet and neither of them got back to me, so I didn't go. I did wake up to check my email on time to have gone, but I didn't go. I'm really annoyed about this because it means I either need to spend more time in flamingo plaza as a greeter, or I have to find other events to sign up for. I should probably look in next month to see when these events might be. Yeah now I'm signed up for something called "Boo at the Zoo" on the 21st. If I don't get enough hours by then, I'll finish up then. It's by the orangutans which I actually know something about having studied them as an anthro major in college.

I don't remember if I mentioned this here or not, but 23andMe is doing a study of people who have been treated for either depression or bipolar disorder, and in exchange for your DNA they'll send you a free ancestry and health report. So I mailed off a vial of my spit to help with that study and find out whether I should be chasing this Polish guy or the English guy on ancestry.com. There are also rumors in my mother's family of some Native American ancestry, which it will be interesting to find out of that is true or not. If you've been treated for bipolar disorder, you can click here to get in on the same deal I did - but time is running out. The depression study is already closed.

I opened a loot pets box today to see if I'd get some kind of a toy I could send with Jack to quarantine, but Kevin wound up really liking the toy inside it (which was a borg cube), so we gave it to Rogue, who will not destroy it instead of Jack, who will.

Done last week (20170917Su - 23Sa)

Sep. 24th, 2017 05:42 pm
mdlbear: the positively imaginary half of a cubic mandelbrot set (Default)
[personal profile] mdlbear

Another rough week, especially Sunday through Tuesday when we didn't have our Bronx. The house felt very sad and lonely. N brought him home from the vet on Wednesday; while she was coming off the ferry she saw the Bath Fitter truck waiting to get on to come and install our new shower.

Bronx is recovering, but he lost a lot of weight over the weekend; he was in really scary shape when he came home. He's better now, but still not his old self. But it's so good to see him rampaging, or at least romping, even if only for a while. Best the vet can figure is that he has some virus -- possibly herpes -- that is mostly dormant but gets reactivated when he gets anything else. Poor little guy! But we have him back! That's the important thing.

We also have our revamped shower -- it's a lot bigger than the old one because it makes better use of space in addition to being a bit deeper, and it has a full-width curtain instead of sliding glass doors, which I hate and Colleen has a lot of trouble with. The floor is only about an inch and a half up, with a squishable rubber dam to keep the water in. It's wonderful.

Another cow sighting Thursday morning when I went out to plug the car in; I'd forgotten Wednesday night. (Friday when Colleen and I went out to the Country Store on the way to dinner, the clerk who checked us out told us that someone from out our way had been in early the previous morning to get some hay "to lure a cow". Right. I know where he lives! Hopefully he came back later for some fencing.

We finally found a good caregiver for Colleen. She'll be coming in only one day/week, Thursday. Our housekeeper comes on Tuesday, so we'll be pretty well covered, and save quite a lot of money over our former 3 day/week schedule. Unlike (previous) G" and all of the others we interviewed, M has made a career of caregiving and loves it.

Link of the week is the Ig-Nobel Prize winning paper, "On the Rheology of Cats", in Rheology Bulletin 2014-07, p. 16. (It's a PDF, so you have to scroll down to it.) You also need to pull down NASA's coffeetable book, Through the Eyes of Cassini

Notes & links, as usual )

A leaf

Sep. 24th, 2017 04:57 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Taken from a couple of angles over about a minute.

Read more... )

I am taking care of someone's cats

Sep. 24th, 2017 04:45 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
As one does, I keep a log of my visits.

The cats expressed their appreciation for my record-keeping.

Read more... )
maellenkleth: (flyingslabs)
[personal profile] maellenkleth
Yesterday's adventure (part one of three) in the Salishaan Prefecture of Cascadia, as shown in photographs.

Darling Spouse and azaer have an eclectic mix of friends, ranging from industrial workers to financiers and various flavours of politicians. Yesterday's adventure was mostly about industrial workers, at lest one of whom was (and still is, as far as we know) the mayor of the hamlet of Coombes, in Salishaan. He does double duty as worker and politician, thusly.

Photographs taken with Sony DSC-H90 electro-optical camera, as usual, on distant-focus setting. 'Point and shoot' is the order of the day..

[4610a/17.jpg] Spar tree and donkey-engines. The 'tree' is a large log, brought from about ten kilometres away, atop the western face of the Beaufort Range, about a metre in diameter at the butt end and thirty metres tall. We are not seeing all of its height, here, as we are more interested in the donkey-engines. In the foreground is the steam-powered engine, built by the Washington Iron Works in Seattle in 1928, and lovingly restored by the tradespeople at the Industrial Heritage Society. Steam-engines much like this machine worked all the way up and down the western coastal rainforests of Cascadia, during the first half of the XXth century. The engine's boiler is mounted vertically above its firebox, and it powers wire-rope winch drums via horizontal pistons and connecting-rods. The engine's fuel is wood. It takes about two hours to raise enough steam to do useful work (150 pounds/inch to work the winch drums, but only 75 pounds/inch to blow the whistle).

Spar tree
The red tank contains fire-fighting water, pressurised by a steam-driven air-compressor. The engine rides on two very stout skids made of bevel-ended cedar logs, which in turn are balanced on a pair of concrete-filled steel pipes. The roof is made of rust-streaked sheets of corrugated iron. Barely visible in the orange vest is Ken Fyfe, the steam-engineer who minds the fire and the steam. Ken (a good old friend and former neighbour of ours) is proud of the quality of the steam that he can raise: 'smooth, with no lumps in it'. Lumpy steam is not a good thing.

In the distance between the spar tree and the donkey-engine, can be seen another engine, also sitting on wooden skids but positioned at a ninety-degree angle to the steam-engine. This second engine runs the spar-tree's 'hayrack boom', the horizontal assembly of bolted-together smaller logs and cut-off railway rails, which slews back and forth to load logs by means of a pair of tongs.

The loading engine is powered by a V-8 Ford petrol-powered engine, termed by the loggers as a 'gas fake' (because when it was first adopted for use in the 1930s, this sort of petrol-driven engine was not regarded to be as useful as a 'real' steam-driven engine). The gas fake is certainly not as powerful as the steam-donkey, but it is much nimbler and responsive to its driver's commands, so it is well-suited to running the hayrack loader.

[4614a/17.jpg] Kahvi aika! Here we see Ken Fyfe's steam-powered coffee-pot. Back in the day, the steam-engineer was a popular fellow to visit on a rainy day, because the donkey had a roof over it, the firebox gave off welcome warmth, and the engineer could be counted-upon to have hot coffee. Steam-powered coffee is wholly excellent to the taste, as we know from direct experience thanks to Ken being willing to share a cuppa with us.

Note the control valve on the steam line, and the narrow diameter of the copper tube that carries the high-pressure steam into the coffee-pot.

[4623a/17.jpg]  The 'gas fake'. Bill (we didn't catch his surname, but we noticed his bright blue trousers) has to be part-octopus, for his hands and feet are wholly-occupied with driving the motor and controlling the winch drums. The gas fake has a standard clutch-and-stick transmission, an accelerator pedal, and drum-mounted brake bands for each of the winches. The engine is by no means as powerful as the steam-donkey, but it can handily change the direction of the winches, to work the hayrack boom back and forth. One of the two winches pulls the boom towards the gas fake, while the other winch works the loading-tongs. "So, how does the gas fake work the boom in the other direction?". It doesn't. Instead, a large cut-off piece of a big log, called a 'chunk', acts as a counterweight to slew the boom outward.



[4620a/17.jpg] Hooking. 'Hooker' is a legitimate occupational title on our electoral rolls. Properly, it's 'hooktender', but 'hooker' is more to the point. The hooker hooks the logs with a pair of sharp metal tongs, so-arranged as to bit into the log when they are lifted by the gas-fake's loading-winch. Metal tongs are dangerous and cantankerous implements: they fail to stick when they should stick, and they refuse to unstick when they shouldn't stick.

The hooker sets the tongs, and then he leaps out of the way, in case the tongs fail to hold the log.

These are 'tame' logs; our logger friends have been using them over and over again for ten years, as the unnamed characters in their demonstrations. The bark long since fell off these logs, which does make it more likely that the tongs will gain a good hold on the logs.





[4626a/17.jpg] Loading. Here's the log drawn-up against the heel of the hayrack boom, now swinging around sideways towards the waiting  logging-truck. That's probably 2000 kilos of wood flying through the air.



The truck was built by the Hayes Truck Company (out of Vancouver, now defunct) in 1956. It is sized for 'off-highway' loads, 4.5 metres wide and 4.5 metres tall, 100 tonnes' weight. The length of the trailer is adjustable to allow for carriage of longer logs, up to 30 metres' length. The trucks were so well-built, that the Hayes Company went out of business on account of fewer loggers needing to buy replacements for worn-out trucks. Old Hayes trucks are still working the mountains of Salishaan sixty years later.

[4631a/17/jpg] Unsticking. Those darned tongs! Won't come loose when you want them to. Here we see the aggravated hooker whaling away on the tongs with the back end of his log-marking hammer. One face of the hammer is just an ordinary square steel lump, suitable for clobbering things, whereas the 'business end' of the hammer is carved into letters and numbers for stamping ownership-marks into the ends of logs. That's how log-salvagers can figure out how drifted-away logs can get back to their owners, should a log-raft be caught in a storm.




This also gives you a nice view of how the bottom of the hayrack is armoured with railway-rails.

By way of explanation, the logging 'show' is led by another old friend of ours, Jack James. We first met Jack while working with a drilling crew (part of a coal-mining company), drilling exploratory holes atop a mountain whose forests were owned by the logging company for which Jack worked. Jack was a genial host to us that summer (Darling Spouse visited there, too, for a few weeks, so she got to meet Jack and his loggers, along with Doug and all the other drillers). There we all were on the side of a mountain, redolant with the odours of pitch, sawdust, and turpentime.

Jack is eighty-five years old, now. He's happy to teach the 'young pups' (sixty-five years old, and themselves retired from logging) how to run the wood out from the forest, the steam-powered way. Because of the long hot summer and its wildfire dangers, Jack had little chance to lead his crew this year. The Forest Service gave special permission for yesterday's demonstration work, on account of most of the attendees being vistors on a forestry tour from Sweden. It was quite the day, indeed. Swedish visitors notwithstanding, that was good Finnish coffee in Ken Fyfe's steam-powered coffee-pot. Kahvi aika, indeed.
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Posted by Amanda

This Is Just My Face

RECOMMENDED: This is Just My Face by Gabourey Sidibe is $2.99 at Amazon! This is a Kindle Daily Deal and isn’t being price-matched yet. Check out the other deals today; there are a few romances included! Redheadedgirl enjoyed this one and gave it an A:

This is a really interesting memoir by someone who I didn’t know much about. She’s got a complicated life story, and a great attitude as she sashays her way through her life. She’s funny, and touching. And, as ever, the inner lives of Black women are still not something that receives nearly enough attention.

The Oscar-nominated Precious star and Empire actress delivers a much-awaited memoir—wise, complex, smart, funny—a version of the American experience different from anything we’ve read

Gabourey Sidibe—“Gabby” to her legion of fans—skyrocketed to international fame in 2009 when she played the leading role in Lee Daniels’s acclaimed movie Precious. In This is Just My Face, she shares a one-of-a-kind life story in a voice as fresh and challenging as many of the unique characters she’s played onscreen. With full-throttle honesty, Sidibe paints her Bed-Stuy/Harlem family life with a polygamous father and a gifted mother who supports her two children by singing in the subway. Sidibe tells the engrossing, inspiring story of her first job as a phone sex “talker.” And she shares her unconventional (of course!) rise to fame as a movie star, alongside “a superstar cast of rich people who lived in mansions and had their own private islands and amazing careers while I lived in my mom’s apartment.”

Sidibe’s memoir hits hard with self-knowing dispatches on friendship, depression, celebrity, haters, fashion, race, and weight (“If I could just get the world to see me the way I see myself,” she writes, “would my body still be a thing you walked away thinking about?”). Irreverent, hilarious, and untraditional, This Is Just My Face takes its place and fills a void on the shelf of writers from Mindy Kaling to David Sedaris to Lena Dunham.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

This book is on sale at:

amazon

 

 

 

Wicked Intentions

RECOMMENDED: Wicked Intentions by Elizabeth Hoyt is $1.99! Elyse really enjoyed this book and gave it an A-:

Serial killer. And Ghost of St. Giles vigilante. And river pirate. And bondage.

If any or all of those things appeal to you, I’d really recommend this book. If you’re looking for a spicy historical, or one not focused around the glittering aristocracy, Wicked Intentions fits the bill. Aside from a few ball scenes, this book takes place among the working class of London.

A man controlled by his desires…

Infamous for his wild, sensual needs, Lazarus Huntington, Lord Caire, is searching for a savage killer in St. Giles, London’s most notorious slum. Widowed Temperance Dews knows St. Giles like the back of her hand— she’s spent a lifetime caring for its inhabitants at the foundling home her family established. Now that home is at risk.

A woman haunted by her past…

Caire makes a simple offer—in return for Temperance’s help navigating the perilous alleys of St. Giles, he will introduce her to London’s high society so that she can find a benefactor for the home. But Temperance may not be the innocent she seems, and what begins as cold calculation soon falls prey to a passion that neither can control—one that may well destroy them both.

A bargain neither could refuse.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

This book is on sale at:

Barnes & Noble Kobo Google Play iBooks

and

amazon

 

 

 

A Duchess in Name

RECOMMENDED: A Duchess in Name by Amanda Weaver is 99c! Redheadedgirl reviewed the book and gave it a B+:

This book involves a massive renovation, a HERO that was won in a card game, awkwardness, and learning to love each other despite a most inauspicious beginning. Throw in some terrible parenting, and we got ourselves what could totally be a miniseries jointly produced by ITV and HGTV.

Victoria Carson never expected love. An American heiress and graduate of Lady Grantham’s finishing school, she’s been groomed since birth to marry an English title—the grander the better. So when the man chosen for her, the forbidding Earl of Dunnley, seems to hate her on sight, she understands that it can’t matter. Love can have no place in this arrangement.

Andrew Hargrave has little use for his title and even less for his cold, disinterested parents. Determined to make his own way, he’s devoted to his life in Italy working as an archaeologist. Until the collapse of his family’s fortune drags him back to England to a marriage he never wanted and a woman he doesn’t care to know.

Wild attraction is an unwanted complication for them both, though it forms the most fragile of bonds. Their marriage of convenience isn’t so intolerable after all—but it may not be enough when the deception that bound them is finally revealed.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

This book is on sale at:

Barnes & Noble Kobo iBooks

and

amazon

 

 

 

Angel’s Ink

Angel’s Ink by Jocelynn Drake is $2.99! This is a paranormal urban fantasy, and the first book in the Asylum Tales series. The book has a 3.6 average on GR, and readers particularly liked the hero, who is a former warlock who now runs his own tattoo parlor. I’m actually pretty interested in this book, but I’m wary about buying it for some reason. Anyone care to weigh in on whether to buy or bypass?

Buyer beware . . .

Looking for a tattoo—and maybe a little something extra: a burst of good luck, a dollop of true love, or even a hex on an ex? Head to the quiet and mysterious Gage, the best skin artist in town. Using unique potions—a blend of extraordinary ingredients and special inks—to etch the right symbol, he can fulfill any heart’s desire. But in a place like Low Town, where elves, faeries, trolls, werewolves, and vampires happily walk among humanity, everything has its price.

No one knows that better than Gage. Turning his back on his own kind, he left the magical Ivory Tower where cruel witches and warlocks rule, a decision that cost him the right to practice magic. And if he disobeys, his punishment—execution—will be swift.

Though he’s tried to fly under the radar, Gage can’t hide from powerful warlocks who want him dead—or the secrets of his own past. But with the help of his friends, Trixie, a gorgeous elf who hides her true identity, and a hulking troll named Bronx, Gage might just make it through this enchanted world alive.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

This book is on sale at:

Barnes & Noble Kobo Google Play iBooks

and

amazon

 

 

 

Accomplishments!

Sep. 24th, 2017 07:52 am
catherineldf: (Default)
[personal profile] catherineldf
 Accomplishments for the weekend: 1. I have an executor for my literary estate! Lambda Literary and I made it official; they'll own the copyright and publishing rights to my ouevre when I shuffle off this mortal coil and all. 2. Second Patreon post for the month is away! This month, the recommendation lists are: sfnal works featuring older women as protagonists and fun music to work to. The nonprofit is the NAACP, out there fighting the good fight against racism and for social justice  for decades. https://www.patreon.com/CLundoff 

On a related note, if you are an author with published books and stories, make a will and designate someone or preferably, an institution likely to outlive you to handle things when you're gone. I have a current archive of my work at the University of Minnesota Tretter Collection, as well as donating to several other libraries, which takes care of what's out right now, but not what happens down the road. Some folks designate friends or the literary agencies they work with, for example. Have faith that someone will want to read your work down the road apiece and do some planning. 
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Posted by Amanda

Lightning Reviews are back with another trio of quick thoughts on a few selected books. We have a must-have cookbook, a Clueless graphic novel, and a YA book that blends fantasy, Chinese folklore, and high school!

 

    Clueless: Senior Year

    author: Amber Benson

    While nothing can match the divine quality of the movie Clueless, the graphic novel Clueless: Senior Year is a fun reunion with Cher, Dionne, and Tai, the main characters from the movie. If you haven’t seen the movie, you should watch it before reading the comic, because the comic will make more sense and because everyone should watch Clueless.

    The story picks up on Cher’s last day of junior year. One of her teachers tells the students that they are being assigned a project. By the end of their senior year, they have to turn in a report on what kind of adult they want to be. Cher, Dionne, and Tai each get a chance to answer that question in their own chapters while Cher’s romance with Josh, her boyfriend who is now in college, suffers due to her experimentation with being an “activist-environmental-entrepreneurial grown-up.”

    Cher’s storyline is, like Cher, adorable. She jumps into her project in the graphic novel with the same overboard enthusiasm with which she jumped into the Tai makeover in the film Clueless. It’s even more fun to see Dionne and Tai come out of Cher’s shadow and develop their own confidence. All three stories are relatable and celebrate both independence and female friendship, with some romance as well.

    My favorite thing about this is the art. It matches the aesthetic of the movie but throws in some grunge drab for a visit to Seattle, and soft earth tones for a trip to Tai’s family farm. Movie fans will be pleased to see that Cher’s poufy pen (what did we call those?) makes many appearances, as does some Lisa Frank-inspired art and a lot of cassette tapes. It’s a fun love letter to the movie and to the 1990’s.

    Carrie S

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    The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

    author: F.C. Yee

    Y’all, I gotta tell you, I’m getting some great pitches from Twitter these days.

    This was billed as a treatment of Journey to the West, and I totally admit that most of what I knew of Journey to the West is from The Forbidden Kingdom, which is not a good movie, and has significant problems, but also has Jackie Chan and Jet Li. As an introduction to “Hey you can read more about this!” for JttW, the film doesn’t suck and the fight scenes are glorious.

    Anyway, The Epic Crush of Genie Lo is about our heroine, Genie, a Chinese-American high school student who is in the midst of college prep when a new student shows up and turns everyone’s life upside down, especially Genie’s. Quentin is annoying, and always around, and Things Happen around him….and he’s also the embodiment of the Monkey King. And he’s drawn to Genie because she’s a reincarnation of another member of the Journey’s party. Together, they have to save the world from escaped demons. And also get into college.

    This was a FUN READ. Genie is hilarious, and fights so hard against destiny because goddammit, this isn’t in the schedule, and also this Quentin dude is annoying and clingy! I find that romances based on literal destiny can be dicey – I like agency in my romances. But they spend enough time together that Genie gets to know Quentin on his own terms and like him for himself, not just because they are supposed to.

    There’s also some great tension between Genie and her mother which explores the children of immigrants dynamic. Add a little magic in there, and things get really fun. Yee also does a really good job of instructing the reader in the salient points of Journey to the West, so if you didn’t grow up with this tale as one of your childhood stories, you can still follow what’s up. I recommend this for anyone looking for fun adventure stories that invert a lot of destiny-romance expectations.

    Redheadedgirl

    ,

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    One-Pan Wonders

    author: Cook's Country

    I don’t usually review cookbooks here, but this book has been making me so happy, I had to share. I first borrowed this cookbook from the library, because the Cook’s Country/America’s Test Kitchen cookbooks can be costly, especially if I end up liking one or two recipes. I ended up liking this cookbook so much, I bought my own copy and have been adding recipes to our rotation since it arrived in July.

    Y’all. Y’ALL. I love this cookbook. I love recipes where I can put a bunch of stuff on a sheet pan or in a dutch oven and let heat and time do their thing while I do all the other things I have to do. Some of the recipes are more hands-on than others, but the ones I’ve made I’ve enjoyed so much. Each section focuses on one container or method of cooking: skillets, sheet pans, dutch ovens, casserole dishes, roasting pans, and slow cookers. There are a set of recipes designed for each method, and I’ve tried several so far.

    I’ve made:

    • Lemony chicken with spinach and potatoes: This one is made in a skillet, and comes together very quickly (a number of the recipes are labeled as “weeknight friendly,” which I appreciate!). The flavors are simple but interesting, and I liked the wilted baby spinach. Usually spinach that’s not raw in a salad makes me gag.
    • Lime ginger chicken with rice: This made a lot of rice, but it was delicious. There are a bunch of different flavors and the combination didn’t get boring. I wanted to keep eating.
    • Italian sausage with peppers, onions, tomatoes, and polenta: I loved this recipe. It’s all cooked on a sheet pan, and the combination of textures and the balance of the sausage, the polenta, and the pepper/tomato mixture was perfect. We’re making this one again very soon.
    • Mexican-style spaghetti squash casserole: I’ve made this three times already. I usually hate squash – I think it has a weird aftertaste. But by heating the spices in olive oil, then tossing the spaghetti squash and the chopped vegetables with that oil means that the spices permeates the squash and yay, no weird aftertaste! I have eaten a portion of this casserole every day for lunch for a week and have been very, very happy about it. (Seriously, yum.)

    If you’re a vegetarian, alas, there aren’t too many recipes in here for you. Most involve meat or fish. And if you eat zero carbs, like no potatoes, rice, or pasta, the pickings get a little sparse.

    But for my weeknight cooking rotation, this cookbook has made me so happy. I am trying new recipes in the next few weeks, and I’ll report back how they go. I love the ease and convenience of using one method or container for the food preparations, and so far the flavors and combinations have been terrific.

    SB Sarah

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