Mar. 6th, 2011

annathepiper: (Starbuck)

I am generally about as low maintenance as it is possible to get with one’s hair. “Have I washed it lately?” and “have I brushed it lately?” are about the only hair-related questions I ask myself, and regardless of what the answers are, I find that there are few hair issues I can’t solve by stuffing it into a scrunchy and hiding it under a hat. I also very rarely get it cut or styled.

But that said, every two and a half to three years or so, I hit a point where my hair becomes officially Annoying, and it is time to whack it off and start over again. I have now reached that point. This time around it’s underscored by the fact that my beloved userinfosolarbird and I are going to a nice dinner on Tuesday night, at which I must dress more formally than usual, and so I wished to do something to my hair to maximize its ability to look decent without me having to do anything to do it.

Therefore she and I went to Great Clips yesterday and a very nice lady gave me the shortest haircut I’ve had in some time. In fact, I’m pretty sure I have Starbuck Hair now, and given my affection for my and Dara’s Crazy TV Girlfriend, this is not a bad thing. I do however promise to not paint weird things on walls, to run afoul of crazy Cylon stalkerboys, or go off on a last doomed mission to find Earth. (I make no promises about avoiding swooning, though, if either Jamie Bamber or Michael Trucco happen to show up.) Also, now I totally want a Galactica flight jacket all over again.

Behold my Starbuck hair!

Shorthaired Anna is Shorthaired

Me the day after my March 5 2011 haircut!

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

annathepiper: (Buh)

I am generally about as low maintenance as it is possible to get with one’s hair. “Have I washed it lately?” and “have I brushed it lately?” are about the only hair-related questions I ask myself, and regardless of what the answers are, I find that there are few hair issues I can’t solve by stuffing it into a scrunchy and hiding it under a hat. I also very rarely get it cut or styled.

But that said, every two and a half to three years or so, I hit a point where my hair becomes officially Annoying, and it is time to whack it off and start over again. I have now reached that point. This time around it’s underscored by the fact that my beloved userinfosolarbird and I are going to a nice dinner on Tuesday night, at which I must dress more formally than usual, and so I wished to do something to my hair to maximize its ability to look decent without me having to do anything to do it.

Therefore she and I went to Great Clips yesterday and a very nice lady gave me the shortest haircut I’ve had in some time. In fact, I’m pretty sure I have Starbuck Hair now, and given my affection for my and Dara’s Crazy TV Girlfriend, this is not a bad thing. I do however promise to not paint weird things on walls, to run afoul of crazy Cylon stalkerboys, or go off on a last doomed mission to find Earth. (I make no promises about avoiding swooning, though, if either Jamie Bamber or Michael Trucco happen to show up.) Also, now I totally want a Galactica flight jacket all over again.

Behold my Starbuck hair!

Shorthaired Anna is Shorthaired

Me the day after my March 5 2011 haircut!

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

annathepiper: (Beckett and Book)

Note: This is a late review from my 2010 book log, posting as I’m trying to get caught up. The 2011 book log will commence once the 2010 reviews are up to date!

Midnight in Ruby Bayou (Donovans Series #4)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The fourth book of Elizabeth Lowell’s Donovans series, Midnight in Ruby Bayou, is for my money the best of the lot. It’s got the most complex of any of the plots in the series up to this point, and since it’s a bit longer than the previous ones as well, Lowell has more time to develop the various characters. This time around, the Donovan Sibling Du Jour is Faith, Hope’s sister, and we finally get some payoff on the plot point set up in previous books, involving an asshole ex-boyfriend. We’ve also got a stolen priceless Russian ruby, and the torrid secrets of a South Carolina family who’ve commissioned Faith to design a necklace for a forthcoming wedding–that of her own best friend.

Lowell does a decent job tying all of these elements together, although there’s a clear demarcation between the half of the story involving “Faith and Owen travel to South Carolina”, and “Faith and Owen arrive at the Monteageaus’ mansion, and deal with all the drama there”, and the transition between the two parts isn’t entirely smooth. But that said, out of all of the lead characters in the Donovans series, I like Faith and Owen the most. Their relationship and chemistry come across to me as the most equal out of any in the series, and not just because Owen is an employee of Faith’s family. He’s the most understated of the male leads in the series, and a lot of this is on purpose as he deliberately plays to the “Southern good ol’ boy” stereotype as well as to the fact that he’s carrying a cane as he recovers from an injury sustained in Afghanistan. Most importantly, while he and Faith do their share of arguing, they get over it quickly, and there’s no Big Misunderstanding sorts of annoyances that so often annoy me in romance and romantic suspense novels.

Once the action shifts to the Montegeaus’ mansion, everything takes on a decidedly darker tone–because at this point the plot delves into the sordid history of the family, and in particular, the crazy old woman Tiga. Questions of alcoholism and incest and murder are all explored, all of which give a bit more weight to this novel than its predecessors. As this is a romantic suspense novel, nothing is ever really graphically called out, though the presence of these plot elements at all may make it a questionable read for some. So be on the lookout for that.

All in all though a decent read. Three stars.

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

annathepiper: (Beckett and Book)

Note: This is a late review from my 2010 book log, posting as I’m trying to get caught up. The 2011 book log will commence once the 2010 reviews are up to date!

Midnight in Ruby Bayou (Donovans Series #4)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The fourth book of Elizabeth Lowell’s Donovans series, Midnight in Ruby Bayou, is for my money the best of the lot. It’s got the most complex of any of the plots in the series up to this point, and since it’s a bit longer than the previous ones as well, Lowell has more time to develop the various characters. This time around, the Donovan Sibling Du Jour is Faith, Hope’s sister, and we finally get some payoff on the plot point set up in previous books, involving an asshole ex-boyfriend. We’ve also got a stolen priceless Russian ruby, and the torrid secrets of a South Carolina family who’ve commissioned Faith to design a necklace for a forthcoming wedding–that of her own best friend.

Lowell does a decent job tying all of these elements together, although there’s a clear demarcation between the half of the story involving “Faith and Owen travel to South Carolina”, and “Faith and Owen arrive at the Monteageaus’ mansion, and deal with all the drama there”, and the transition between the two parts isn’t entirely smooth. But that said, out of all of the lead characters in the Donovans series, I like Faith and Owen the most. Their relationship and chemistry come across to me as the most equal out of any in the series, and not just because Owen is an employee of Faith’s family. He’s the most understated of the male leads in the series, and a lot of this is on purpose as he deliberately plays to the “Southern good ol’ boy” stereotype as well as to the fact that he’s carrying a cane as he recovers from an injury sustained in Afghanistan. Most importantly, while he and Faith do their share of arguing, they get over it quickly, and there’s no Big Misunderstanding sorts of annoyances that so often annoy me in romance and romantic suspense novels.

Once the action shifts to the Montegeaus’ mansion, everything takes on a decidedly darker tone–because at this point the plot delves into the sordid history of the family, and in particular, the crazy old woman Tiga. Questions of alcoholism and incest and murder are all explored, all of which give a bit more weight to this novel than its predecessors. As this is a romantic suspense novel, nothing is ever really graphically called out, though the presence of these plot elements at all may make it a questionable read for some. So be on the lookout for that.

All in all though a decent read. Three stars.

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

annathepiper: (Castle and Beckett and Book)

Note: This is a late review from my 2010 book log, posting as I’m trying to get caught up. The 2011 book log will commence once the 2010 reviews are up to date!

Homicide in Hardcover (Bibliophile Series #1)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

There is a distinct level of irony in reading a book about a girl whose profession is “restorer of old books” in ebook form. And in some ways, the dichotomy of this–of reading a book about an old profession via very modern means–carried over into my reaction to the plot. Not entirely positively, either.

Our heroine, Brooklyn Wainwright, inadvertantly stumbles across the murder of her mentor, and as a result is drafted in his stead to restore a rare and supposedly cursed copy of Faust as the showpiece of a family collection. But she’s also suspected of both murder and theft, and repeatedly runs afoul of a dour security agent hired to investigate the goings-on.

Toss in the obligatory Colorful Family, and you’ve got decent makings for a fluffy but entertaining cozy mystery. Problem for me was, Brooklyn for me as a heroine oftentimes fell kind of flat. My main beef with her was the repeated scenes of snark between her and her nemesis, Minka LaBoeuf; most of the snark was unfortunately merely petty rather than actively witty, and the situation wasn’t helped much by Minka not serving a plot function above and beyond “being there for Brooklyn to be snarky at”. She’s regularly described in spitefully unflattering terms, up to and including digs at her weight. This wasn’t cool, and rather than accomplishing the goal of having me feel snarky to her because Brooklyn was, it instead made me feel sorry at Minka and annoyed that narrative space was being wasted having Brooklyn pettily snark at her.

This really though was my only real problem with the book. Brooklyn does have an entertaining family, and once Dour British Security Guy actually unwinds enough to start being a real character, he’s fun too. The latter third of the book is the best, even given a brief and unnecessary diversion into “cozy paranormal” territory rather than just “cozy”. Two and a half stars, though for Goodreads review purposes I’ll go ahead and round up to three.

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

annathepiper: (Castle and Beckett and Book)

Note: This is a late review from my 2010 book log, posting as I’m trying to get caught up. The 2011 book log will commence once the 2010 reviews are up to date!

Homicide in Hardcover (Bibliophile Series #1)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

There is a distinct level of irony in reading a book about a girl whose profession is “restorer of old books” in ebook form. And in some ways, the dichotomy of this–of reading a book about an old profession via very modern means–carried over into my reaction to the plot. Not entirely positively, either.

Our heroine, Brooklyn Wainwright, inadvertantly stumbles across the murder of her mentor, and as a result is drafted in his stead to restore a rare and supposedly cursed copy of Faust as the showpiece of a family collection. But she’s also suspected of both murder and theft, and repeatedly runs afoul of a dour security agent hired to investigate the goings-on.

Toss in the obligatory Colorful Family, and you’ve got decent makings for a fluffy but entertaining cozy mystery. Problem for me was, Brooklyn for me as a heroine oftentimes fell kind of flat. My main beef with her was the repeated scenes of snark between her and her nemesis, Minka LaBoeuf; most of the snark was unfortunately merely petty rather than actively witty, and the situation wasn’t helped much by Minka not serving a plot function above and beyond “being there for Brooklyn to be snarky at”. She’s regularly described in spitefully unflattering terms, up to and including digs at her weight. This wasn’t cool, and rather than accomplishing the goal of having me feel snarky to her because Brooklyn was, it instead made me feel sorry at Minka and annoyed that narrative space was being wasted having Brooklyn pettily snark at her.

This really though was my only real problem with the book. Brooklyn does have an entertaining family, and once Dour British Security Guy actually unwinds enough to start being a real character, he’s fun too. The latter third of the book is the best, even given a brief and unnecessary diversion into “cozy paranormal” territory rather than just “cozy”. Two and a half stars, though for Goodreads review purposes I’ll go ahead and round up to three.

Mirrored from annathepiper.org.

Profile

annathepiper: (Default)
Anna the Piper

February 2017

S M T W T F S
    123 4
567 891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728    

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Feb. 23rd, 2017 06:25 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios